State and National Policy and Reform Initiatives

SFY Engages in Policy Debates

Should officers receive special training to work with youth? Should school security guards be trained how to work with children with special needs? Should policies regarding use of force with youth be different than policies for adults? Should states record juvenile confessions? Should police departments have special policies for treatment of children who observe the arrest of their parents?

Legislators, reformer communities, government agencies and parents ask SFY these questions and often seek research and model policies.

SFY also issues statements on decrees, policies and legislation. Read some of our statements below:

  • Defense Department 1033 Program
    Sept. 5, 2017. Coalition letter to the House Representatives calling for a moratorium on the Defense Department’s 1033 Program which provides police with military equipment.
  • Massachusetts House Bill 766
    July 27, 2017. Statement in support of MA HB 766, an act to reduce sexual exploitation of victims of human trafficking.
  • Massachusetts Senate Bill 876
    July 11, 2017. Statement in support of MA SB 876, an act to decriminalize non-violent and verbal student misconduct.
  • Ferguson Consent Decree
    Feb. 1, 2016. Public Comments Regarding the Department of Justice Investigation and Proposed Consent Decree Agreement.

 

Policy Statements & Materials about Police in Schools

SFY also issues policy statements and analyses on the placement of police in schools. These materials are developed for use by all—schools, law enforcement, community organizations and parents.

SFY has had the privilege of working with the US Department of Education (USDOE) to address discipline issues relating to SROs. In addition to attending and speaking at the RETHINK DISCIPLINE conference at the White House in July 2015, SFY was:

Improving Treatment of Children at the Time of a Parent’s Arrest

SFY has developed a model policy for departments that addresses best practices for law enforcement officers and agencies when a parent is arrested in the presence of children. Sadly, the need for such policies and practices has dramatically increased. Today approximately 2 million children have a parent or parents who are incarcerated.

SFY understands that how children perceive police treatment of parents’ arrests, affects how they perceive and interact with police for the future. SFY’s policy offers guidance:

FIRST DO NO HARM: Model Practices for Law Enforcement Agencies When Arresting Parents in the Presence of Children (2005)

This report outlines key model practices law enforcement agencies can use to safeguard children from the long- and short-term impacts of being present when a parent is arrested.

For More information

For more information or to engage Strategies for Youth, contact:
Lisa Thurau, Executive Director,  at lht@strategiesforyouth.org

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